Are You Servicing Your Audience? On The Rock Star Branding Podcast

Are You Servicing Your Audience?The Rock Star Branding Podcast, June 26, 2013 – Ep. #59 – Are You Servicing Your Audience?

Join Brian Thompson, Michael Brandvold & Greg Kihn. We are joined by our brand new co-host rock star, author and radio dj Greg Kihn. Greg has toured the world, spent over 16 years in morning radio, released numerous albums, had hit MTV videos.. he has even had Weird Al Yankovic cover his hit single Jeopardy. Greg is filled with REAL stories from the radio, from the studio, from the music business.

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Two Guys Bullsh@#ting About Music, Live From Canadian Music Week 2012 – The Music Biz Weekly Podcast

The Music Biz Weekly PodcastWelcome to episode 51 of The Music Biz Weekly, a weekly podcast co-hosted by Michael Brandvold and Brian Thompson.

This week’s episode, March 23, 2012 – Two Guys Bullsh@#ting About Music, Live From Canadian Music Week 2012.

Each week Michael and Brian will discuss the latest events in the music business and music marketing events and techniques.

If you like the podcast I ask that you visit iTunes and please Rate & Review The Music Biz Weekly.

Tune in every week for the latest discussions and comments on the music business

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Are Musicians Still Delusional About Getting Signed? – The Music Biz Weekly Podcast

The Music Biz Weekly PodcastWelcome to episode 32 of The Music Biz Weekly, a weekly podcast co-hosted by Michael Brandvold and Brian Thompson.

Each week Michael and Brian will discuss the latest events in the music business and music marketing events and techniques.

This week’s episode, November 4, 2011 – Are Musicians Still Delusional About Getting Signed?

Links Mentioned:

If you like the podcast I ask that you visit iTunes and please Rate & Review The Music Biz Weekly.

Tune in every week for the latest discussions and comments on the music business

Follow us on Twitter:

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About Michael Brandvold:

Michael Brandvold is a freelance music industry consultant based in Northern California. Having launched Michael Brandvold Marketing to leverage his years of experience to provide direction to large and small clients in the areas of online & social marketing as well as e-commerce and customer acquisition and retention.

Gene Simmons of KISS first tapped Michael’s skills as a pioneering online marketing strategist to launch and manage all aspects of Kissonline.com’s multi-million dollar enterprise, including their ground-breaking VIP ticket program.

Michael has also managed the online efforts for Motley Crüe, Rod Stewart, Madonna, Ozzy Osbourne, Madonna and Britney Spears to name only a few.

About Brian Thompson:

Brian Thompson, Managing Partner for Thorny Bleeder Records, is a Vancouver based music industry entrepreneur, record label owner, artist manager, marketing consultant, radio promoter, publicist, web designer, blogger, and industry speaker.

Formerly the corporate head of music buying and marketing for a large national music retail chain, Brian has since moved on to become a well respected voice on the convergence of artist development, music marketing, social media, and technology.

Transcriptions done with assistance from Tak (pronouced TACK) from The Pawnshop Manual. Go check their music out at www.thepawnshopmanual.com.

Are Many Musicians Wired to Not Do It Themselves?

Todd Murphy The Jazz LawyerThe letter below from Todd Murphy a music lawyer is taken from the November 2, 2011 Bob Lefsetz email newsletter. The same day Bob emailed this out I met with Bob Baker and Jack Conte from Pomplamoose. Interestingly enough, we made almost the exact same comments.

  • So many artists do not want to do it themselves.
  • That it must be wired into their DNA that they want a record deal.
  • And, they really just want to be famous more than anything else.
  • While chatting with Jack Conte from Pomplamoose he mentioned how even now he will go to a party or event and someone from outside the industry will often say, “well I hope someday that you make it.”

I think the ReverbNation survey that revealed 75% of artists still want to be signed speaks to how many artists still see the label deal as the goal.

Nobody is going to do it for you. Nobody is going to give you a big advance. You have to do the work. You have to manage your career. You have to be the boss.

Great letter Todd, I hope all musicians read this.

Subject: Re: Occupy EMI/Sony/Universal/Warner Brothers

Bob, unfortunately, I get called everyday by yet another artist who wants me to shop his or her demo to a label. After asking so many of them the same question you did today – why?  - I have come to realize two things: one, most artists DO NOT want to do it themselves, maybe they just aren’t wired that way, maybe they’re lazy, maybe they think they need big money to make it really happen, maybe they are getting bad advice. Two, they don’t care about making a bad deal, they want to be FAMOUS.  They want fame so fucking badly they will sign anything. I mean anything. They don’t believe guys like you and me when we tell them it’s stupid. They want to be FAMOUS!  Gaga did it an so can they. Katy Perry did it too. So can they.

When you show them Pomplamouse and The Weekend, and others, they just yawn.  How about Julia Nines on Kickstarter? Nah, They want to be in Spin and Rolling Stone and all of the other old media pubs whose time has come and gone. They want to be on NPR and in the NY Tines. They want to say “hey look at me, I made it Mom!”

If they have to be poor to get that, so be it. Maybe some day they can even be on Letterman or SNL. And as far as being poor, they don’t believe us, Gaga looks rich!

Bob, I just don’t know how to get through to these artists. As you have said before, they want to be famous but they want me to do all of the work. Just like they got the soccer trophy without ever scoring a goal. They want me to call in a favor or two and get them a record deal then get the label to do all of the work to make them famous. They aren’t willing to put in the time to build a fanbase, they want the label to do all of that work. Oh, yeah, and they want me to do it on a contingent basis, you know, my typical 5 or 10 percent. I say percent of what?  There won’t be an advance and you’ll never make any money. Let me show you how to do it yourself and we can both make some money and have long careers.

Any takers?

Todd Murphy
Entertainment Lawyer

If You Are Over 30 Years Old You Are Starting Over, Read This!

Mick JaggerBob Lefsetz has delivered another great post. This time Mick Jagger and his new band Superheavy are the focus of his commentary. Do the dinosaur acts and artists know how to market and sell their music in this new era? Do they even know how to contact their audience?

96. Superheavy

Sales this week: 7,399
Cume: 29,710
Weeks on chart: 3
Percentage drop: -40.1

1. Mick Jagger doesn’t know who his audience is.

I’m not saying he doesn’t have an idea who might buy this album, it’s just that he doesn’t have a personal relationship with them, he has no line of communication, HE DOESN’T HAVE THEIR E-MAIL ADDRESSES!

That’s your number one promotion job, finding out exactly who your audience is. So you can make them aware of your new work and infect them and get them to spread the word. This is the most efficient marketing system. It’s direct to fan. And it’s incumbent upon all acts to do this.

2. If you want sales make Top Forty music.

You can get around this if you’re the Dave Matthews Band, if you know who your audience is as per #1 above. If not, you’re gonna sell bupkes.

3. If you’re gonna make Top Forty music, work with Dr. Luke or Max Martin, the producer/writer du jour.

You might think the Top Forty game is simple, but it’s not. The winners in the field have not only worked in it for years, they’ve studied it, they know what works, they’ve put in the time. Respect them for it.

4. If you don’t make Top Forty music, you must go on the road.

That’s where you build careers today, that’s where you maintain them. But if you’re doing something new, you’ve got to break all the rules. People don’t expect the solo band member to replicate the group hits, they expect to be disappointed. So they don’t want to go, they certainly don’t want to overpay. So you’ve got to underplay and undercharge as an investment in your career. And you’ve got to over-deliver, so when you come back again, soon, patrons will bring their friends, so you can build. It’s a lot of hard work, something that’s anathema to the superstars going solo.

5. TV can sell music.

If you’re on the show and the track is perceived to be good. Ergo the success of “Moves Like Jagger” and the failure of the Steven Tyler track.

A guest shot is almost meaningless. What you’re selling here is your connection with the viewer, who sees you every week. They feel like they know you. They’ll buy the track in solidarity if they believe it’s great. Tyler’s track was a joke, a boring, perfunctory exercise. Today you’ve got to be better than great to succeed. J. Lo delivered a track better than what she’d done in years, so her fans bought it, but no one else did, because J. Lo’s a great dancer, can be a good actress, but she’s a no-talent musical artist.

6. You have to ask yourself if you’re a musician or a star.

Mick Jagger is certainly a star. But no one thinks he’s a musician. Most people believe he hasn’t done anything great since the sixties. You can no longer coast, unless you’re going on the road and playing those ancient hits. You’ve got to prove it every day.

7. Mainstream publicity reaches the mainstream.

And the mainstream is last, they’re the followers, not the chance-takers. The movers and shakers, the early adopters who’ll spread the word, ignore the mainstream press. Better to reach a few fanatical bloggers than the “New York Times”.

8. Everything above is known to everybody under thirty. But it’s all a secret to everybody over thirty, especially those who’ve had success in the past.

Artists don’t realize that today your past history gives you a foot in the door and nothing more. Youngsters know it’s all about the grass roots, building community online, or playing the overly-promoted Top Forty game.

It’s fine if you want to give up. But if you want to make new music and have it get traction today you must obey the above rules. And the music must be great. But that’s no guarantee everybody’s going to pay attention. This is where your history hurts you, people expect your new material to be crap. If it’s great, you have to wait for the hype to die down and for the music to percolate in society. Traction will be slow and small. This album may not ever blow up. It may be the one after or the one after that.

You’re starting all over.

Believe it.

via Lefsetz Letter » Blog Archive » Superheavy.